Reviews

The Christian Science Monitor, March 25, 2003, Marjorie Coeyman

“Penn-Nabrit is candid about the things she felt she could have done better.  Each chapter finishes with advice for parents, most of which transcends issues of both race and homeschooling.  Ultimately, this is a how-to book for parents with children of any color, but it carries with it a troubling subtext: These talented young men might have remained in public school if their parents had believed they would get a fair shake.”

 

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, Spring 2003, Shirlee Taylor Haizlip ’59
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“Penn-Nabrit offers a heartfelt yet Socratic rumination on what it means to be educated. She and her husband wanted a ‘classic’ education for their sons-including arts, humanities, science, mathematics, geography, current events, economics and French. Their goal was a ‘holistic balance’ and a striving for wisdom, excellence, and understanding. Threaded throughout the book are her observations of what it means to be black and what strategies blacks employ to maintain their sanity and safety in a country that does not always have their interests at heart.”
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The Crisis, July/August 2003, Michael Fletcher
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“The book provides a long list of practical tips that should be a useful resource to anyone considering home schooling…there is much to learn about the power of parental involvement in children’s education from the Nabrit’s home schooling experience. And these lessons are valuable to all parents who believe young people are mostly educated at home, regardless of where they attend school.”
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Black Issues Book Review”,1]
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// ]]>Wellesley Magazine
, Spring 2003, Shirlee Taylor Haizlip ’59 

“Penn-Nabrit offers a heartfelt yet Socratic rumination on what it means to be educated. She and her husband wanted a ‘classic’ education for their sons-including arts, humanities, science, mathematics, geography, current events, economics and French.  Their goal was a ‘holistic balance’ and a striving for wisdom, excellence, and understanding.  Threaded throughout the book are her observations of what it means to be black and what strategies blacks employ to maintain their sanity and safety in a country that does not always have their interests at heart.”

 

The Crisis, July/August 2003, Michael Fletcher

“The book provides a long list of practical tips that should be a useful resource to anyone considering home schooling…there is much to learn about the power of parental involvement in children’s education from the Nabrit’s home schooling experience.  And these lessons are valuable to all parents who believe young people are mostly educated at home, regardless of where they attend school.”

 

Black Issues Book Review, September-October 2003, Sharita Hunt

Morning by Morning is both about ‘how we did it’ and ‘why we did it.’ Penn-Nabrit poses questions and gives advice at the end of each chapter to help readers think through the possibility of homeschooling. The underlying principles apply to whatever educational choice a family makes. The Appendix contains a list of helpful Web sites.”

 

Ohioana Quarterly, Fall 2003, DeOnna L. Reliford

“Penn-Nabrit’s conversational style readily lends itself to reading.  Her introspective account of her family’s home-schooling experience ranges from the hilarious, yet insightful, incidences to the more sobering observations of how far today’s society has yet to go in dealing with the issues of race and culture in society…This book comes highly recommended, not only as a book for black families, but as a book for people of all races and cultures.  Certainly Penn-Nabrit writes on a topic of importance to everyone, and that is the importance of family.”

 

Letter from Marva Collins, noted educator

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D(["mb","“The book, Morning by Morning only reminded me of why I began Marva Collins Preparatory three decades ago, and why I refuse all federal funds or grants of any kind. Thank you for sending the book, I mention it in all my speeches!”
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Acknowledgement from NYU Law School Professor Derrick Bell
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“In my recent book, Silent Covenants: Brown v. Board and the Quest for Racial Justice, I have cited your book in the chapter on ‘Searching for Effective Schools in the Post-Brown Era.’”
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Peace-Let’s Continue to Pray For It!

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Paula Penn-Nabrit

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614-899-2723 (phone)

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// ]]>“The book, Morning by Morning only reminded me of why I began Marva Collins Preparatory three decades ago, and why I refuse all federal funds or grants of any kind.  Thank you for sending the book, I mention it in all my speeches!”

 

Acknowledgement from NYU Law School Professor Derrick Bell

“In my recent book, Silent Covenants: Brown v. Board and the Quest for Racial Justice, I have cited your book in the chapter on ‘Searching for Effective Schools in the Post-Brown Era.’”

Article Publications

Ebony Magazine A Family Affair Issue, December 2005
Ohioana Quarterly Awards and Annual Report Issue, Fall 2003
Jet Magazine September 1, 2003
Family Digest Back-to-school Issue, 2003
Crisis Magazine August 2003
Essence Magazine August 2003
Atlanta Tribune June 2003
Celebratingchildren.com April 2003
heart & soul Magazine April 2003
Teacher Magazine March 2003
Columbus Dispatch February 19, 2003